/page/2

Watch This! Preview for The Silvering Path film. #SilveringPath

caaaaaaaaabbages!!!!!

caaaaaaaaabbages!!!!!

INTRODUCTION by Haruko Nishimura
 
I was given an opportunity to commission three artists to work with me for this project.  I wanted to work with Colin, Mandy and Ian, all three are visionaries with unique and distinct languages - so different from each other and from mine -I approached them because I knew that they would give me a challenge that would be out of my comfort zone.  It was my hope that we could freely express our ideas and visions together,  developing the “whole” together in a thoroughly collaborative process seeing how far it would take us…  Not only did they fulfill their part of challenge, but we were able to create a space in which we could try things we’d been dying to try, finding a process with which we were able to weave each others ideas into a single vision. We spent long hours together,  traveled to film locations and got know each other better and to really work in-depth and  learning each other’s ways of working.
 
The first  video- interactive dance piece featuring Colin Ernst’s sculpture sound dress was inspired by 70’s American weeeble waaable toy “it weebles and it waables but it wont fall down..” (which I was not familiar at all coming from Japan).  After Jenny, his wife showed me her childhood toy, I understood how Colin’s playful ideas were set into motion (literally).   Colin, a full time father, strapped his baby daughter on his back and came to rehearsals, coaching me how to ride the sculpture.
 
The film, by Ian Lucero, was a collaboration between Mandy, Ian and I. Mandy initially had a vision of a Banana slug and an obsession with the beautiful forests of the Smoke Farm (smokefarm.org) .  She already had a strong sense of where the characters would dwell and exist.  Ian, with his unique perspective - appreciation of hyper-microscopic detail and incredible kinesthetic sense of sound was already at work, sending  E- mails from Portland, incredible images he shot and found for the inspirations for the film.  Ian and Mandy’s visual sensibility - sculptural, spatial, angles and light - motivated and fascinated me. The concepts organically grew as we started shooting, as if we were runners passing a baton to one another.  I watched and helped crochet - Mandy’s fingers crocheted at the speed of a slurping noodle, all the while attending her 4 year old son Hazel with such presence and focus.
 
All of these pieces were also hugely impacted by the dedication and creative insight of musician / composer Jeffrey Huston who dedicated months to making these live performances what they are.
 
Leo Mayberry’s video work was also a huge part of this show as well.  What started out as a simple idea to enhance a scene, ended up a huge project of its own (turning my house into a film studio for a week!).
 
Along with the countless hours of work by the artists involved in this production, there were many many other volunteer workers who attended the crochet parties, and building parties and other work sessions – such generous people who believe in this work.
 
I would like to deeply thank my other co-conspiritors including Anna Lange, Chris  Lefebvre, Robb Kunz, Tina Bunck, Joshua Kohl, and DK Pan and NKO of FreeSheep Foundation as this show would not be possible without them. 
 
Please keep your eyes out for my next projects that I am doing with Degenerate Art Ensemble; SONIC TALES, not to be missed, March 7th2009 at the Moore Theater, presented by STG/Paramount and a work in progress presentation at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York in February 2009.
 
-Haruko Nishimura October 9th, 2008

INTRODUCTION by Haruko Nishimura

I was given an opportunity to commission three artists to work with me for this project.  I wanted to work with Colin, Mandy and Ian, all three are visionaries with unique and distinct languages - so different from each other and from mine -I approached them because I knew that they would give me a challenge that would be out of my comfort zone.  It was my hope that we could freely express our ideas and visions together,  developing the “whole” together in a thoroughly collaborative process seeing how far it would take us…  Not only did they fulfill their part of challenge, but we were able to create a space in which we could try things we’d been dying to try, finding a process with which we were able to weave each others ideas into a single vision. We spent long hours together,  traveled to film locations and got know each other better and to really work in-depth and  learning each other’s ways of working.

The first  video- interactive dance piece featuring Colin Ernst’s sculpture sound dress was inspired by 70’s American weeeble waaable toy “it weebles and it waables but it wont fall down..” (which I was not familiar at all coming from Japan).  After Jenny, his wife showed me her childhood toy, I understood how Colin’s playful ideas were set into motion (literally).   Colin, a full time father, strapped his baby daughter on his back and came to rehearsals, coaching me how to ride the sculpture.

The film, by Ian Lucero, was a collaboration between Mandy, Ian and I. Mandy initially had a vision of a Banana slug and an obsession with the beautiful forests of the Smoke Farm (smokefarm.org) .  She already had a strong sense of where the characters would dwell and exist.  Ian, with his unique perspective - appreciation of hyper-microscopic detail and incredible kinesthetic sense of sound was already at work, sending  E- mails from Portland, incredible images he shot and found for the inspirations for the film.  Ian and Mandy’s visual sensibility - sculptural, spatial, angles and light - motivated and fascinated me. The concepts organically grew as we started shooting, as if we were runners passing a baton to one another.  I watched and helped crochet - Mandy’s fingers crocheted at the speed of a slurping noodle, all the while attending her 4 year old son Hazel with such presence and focus.

All of these pieces were also hugely impacted by the dedication and creative insight of musician / composer Jeffrey Huston who dedicated months to making these live performances what they are.

Leo Mayberry’s video work was also a huge part of this show as well.  What started out as a simple idea to enhance a scene, ended up a huge project of its own (turning my house into a film studio for a week!).

Along with the countless hours of work by the artists involved in this production, there were many many other volunteer workers who attended the crochet parties, and building parties and other work sessions – such generous people who believe in this work.

I would like to deeply thank my other co-conspiritors including Anna Lange, Chris  Lefebvre, Robb Kunz, Tina Bunck, Joshua Kohl, and DK Pan and NKO of FreeSheep Foundation as this show would not be possible without them.

Please keep your eyes out for my next projects that I am doing with Degenerate Art Ensemble; SONIC TALES, not to be missed, March 7th2009 at the Moore Theater, presented by STG/Paramount and a work in progress presentation at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York in February 2009.

-Haruko Nishimura October 9th, 2008

So the premier of “The Silvering Path” is over!  But it will evolve and grow and live on in other forms and places.  I’ve had such a rush of people after each show wanting to talk with me about the piece, and emails, I thought I would paste my thoughts about the process of making this work here (which was in the dark in the theatre).And Haruko wrote some really incisive words in the program about what her intention was …I will hunt them down and post as well.  This has been such an expanding and thrilling project and I am personally so grateful for all the hard work and talent and positive vibe of all the people Haruko brought together to create this experience!  I know there are many many people who are quite invigorated  about what they saw and felt at the Free Sheep."My approachto this collaboration adventure was to just stay what I am – a sculptor and installation artist. I usually make large installations that transform spaces into seemingly enchanted environments, creating full body experiences, like trespassing on a theatrical set. This film turns this on its head; the remarkable environment we live in becomes a ready-made installation. I approached the body as an armature that is usually made of steel and paper mache, but now flesh, blood and Huge and Heroic Haruko spirit. Building a flexible but lumbering skin around her body was one approach to tap into the bizarre and almost otherworldly undulations of the Arion Slug. My Slug is a goddess, one of appetite and compassionate desire, moving all dead matter through its liminal state towards creative regeneration. In this cycle, none of us can escape the Silvering Path. In Haruko’s hands and body, the sculpture I started now tells its own story of hunger, indulgence, transformation and Eros. She is both creator and destroyer. The silvery slime continues in the vein of my installations from the past several years; which is to make visceral transitory states of the human emotional experience tangible through the overabundance of crocheted fabric. I’ve used Pheromones to represent love, Blood to show sacrifice and loyalty, and Milk is caretaking and the physicality of empathy. The Silvery mucus of a tiny creature can transform our bodies into infinite possibility, which is both terrifying and liberating. The thin glittering line represents the preciousness of our time here in this body, both valiant and evanescent.Just as in our film, our collaboration is three heads, hands and hearts woven together; So too are woven in a million tiny gestures, crochet stitches made by myself, friends and strangers alike. Like the Three Fates spinning out human destiny, our film keeps time with a woven cloth of soil. At the end, our hero looks back on a patchwork of her life’s work, both comforting and lasting and continuing to grow after she is gone. I can only hope for the same myself, and I believe it is the root of all creative actions.My most Earnest thanks to Haruko and Ian for their generosity and talents, and for lending me a hand in my own growth as an artist and person.”

mandy

So the premier of “The Silvering Path” is over!  But it will evolve and grow and live on in other forms and places.  I’ve had such a rush of people after each show wanting to talk with me about the piece, and emails, I thought I would paste my thoughts about the process of making this work here (which was in the dark in the theatre).
And Haruko wrote some really incisive words in the program about what her intention was …I will hunt them down and post as well.  This has been such an expanding and thrilling project and I am personally so grateful for all the hard work and talent and positive vibe of all the people Haruko brought together to create this experience!  I know there are many many people who are quite invigorated  about what they saw and felt at the Free Sheep.
"My approach
to this collaboration adventure was to just stay what I am – a sculptor and installation artist. I usually make large installations that transform spaces into seemingly enchanted environments, creating full body experiences, like trespassing on a theatrical set. This film turns this on its head; the remarkable environment we live in becomes a ready-made installation. I approached the body as an armature that is usually made of steel and paper mache, but now flesh, blood and Huge and Heroic Haruko spirit. Building a flexible but lumbering skin around her body was one approach to tap into the bizarre and almost otherworldly undulations of the Arion Slug. My Slug is a goddess, one of appetite and compassionate desire, moving all dead matter through its liminal state towards creative regeneration. In this cycle, none of us can escape the Silvering Path. In Haruko’s hands and body, the sculpture I started now tells its own story of hunger, indulgence, transformation and Eros. She is both creator and destroyer. The silvery slime continues in the vein of my installations from the past several years; which is to make visceral transitory states of the human emotional experience tangible through the overabundance of crocheted fabric. I’ve used Pheromones to represent love, Blood to show sacrifice and loyalty, and Milk is caretaking and the physicality of empathy. The Silvery mucus of a tiny creature can transform our bodies into infinite possibility, which is both terrifying and liberating. The thin glittering line represents the preciousness of our time here in this body, both valiant and evanescent.
Just as in our film, our collaboration is three heads, hands and hearts woven together; So too are woven in a million tiny gestures, crochet stitches made by myself, friends and strangers alike. Like the Three Fates spinning out human destiny, our film keeps time with a woven cloth of soil. At the end, our hero looks back on a patchwork of her life’s work, both comforting and lasting and continuing to grow after she is gone. I can only hope for the same myself, and I believe it is the root of all creative actions.
My most Earnest thanks to Haruko and Ian for their generosity and talents, and for lending me a hand in my own growth as an artist and person.”

mandy

A Thousand Thanks To the Ninjas
Every night, I am more and more a fan of the musical stylings of the Ninjas, Joshua Kohl and Jeffrey Huston.  I don’t think I can ever taste nutella again without hearing “click-click, breath, stomp, breath, stomp, click-click”.  It all wouldn’t be half as gorgeous to watch and take in without the amazing sound and music!  thank you.
mandy 

A Thousand Thanks To the Ninjas

Every night, I am more and more a fan of the musical stylings of the Ninjas, Joshua Kohl and Jeffrey Huston.  I don’t think I can ever taste nutella again without hearing “click-click, breath, stomp, breath, stomp, click-click”.  It all wouldn’t be half as gorgeous to watch and take in without the amazing sound and music!  thank you.

mandy 

ww short inspiration

ww short inspiration

ideas for weeble wobble shorts

ideas for weeble wobble shorts

Ideas for weeble wobble shorts

Ideas for weeble wobble shorts

Kindred Media just posted this video clip about Haruko Nishimura (aka. The Slug Princess) on Vimeo. It is really well made.

the reviews for our show are starting to appear…
'Silvering Path' a memorable collision of dance, music, film and art
- by Michael Upchurch The Seattle Times

the reviews for our show are starting to appear…

'Silvering Path' a memorable collision of dance, music, film and art

- by Michael Upchurch The Seattle Times

Behind the Scenes #3: The Silvering Path

Shows Kamala PA’ing and documenting, Otis the war paint dog, and Mandy discussing stump scene while I have gastric issues.


Created with Admarket's flickrSLiDR.

A whole bunch of new photos by Kamala Dolphin-Kingsley from the shoot at Smoke Farm.

Behind the Scenes #2: The Silvering Path

Haruko preps for the mirror and field scene while Paul looks for river caves, drives across a raging river and gets some much needed sleep.

The Silvering Path

Preview 2

Watch This! Preview for The Silvering Path film. #SilveringPath

caaaaaaaaabbages!!!!!

caaaaaaaaabbages!!!!!

INTRODUCTION by Haruko Nishimura
 
I was given an opportunity to commission three artists to work with me for this project.  I wanted to work with Colin, Mandy and Ian, all three are visionaries with unique and distinct languages - so different from each other and from mine -I approached them because I knew that they would give me a challenge that would be out of my comfort zone.  It was my hope that we could freely express our ideas and visions together,  developing the “whole” together in a thoroughly collaborative process seeing how far it would take us…  Not only did they fulfill their part of challenge, but we were able to create a space in which we could try things we’d been dying to try, finding a process with which we were able to weave each others ideas into a single vision. We spent long hours together,  traveled to film locations and got know each other better and to really work in-depth and  learning each other’s ways of working.
 
The first  video- interactive dance piece featuring Colin Ernst’s sculpture sound dress was inspired by 70’s American weeeble waaable toy “it weebles and it waables but it wont fall down..” (which I was not familiar at all coming from Japan).  After Jenny, his wife showed me her childhood toy, I understood how Colin’s playful ideas were set into motion (literally).   Colin, a full time father, strapped his baby daughter on his back and came to rehearsals, coaching me how to ride the sculpture.
 
The film, by Ian Lucero, was a collaboration between Mandy, Ian and I. Mandy initially had a vision of a Banana slug and an obsession with the beautiful forests of the Smoke Farm (smokefarm.org) .  She already had a strong sense of where the characters would dwell and exist.  Ian, with his unique perspective - appreciation of hyper-microscopic detail and incredible kinesthetic sense of sound was already at work, sending  E- mails from Portland, incredible images he shot and found for the inspirations for the film.  Ian and Mandy’s visual sensibility - sculptural, spatial, angles and light - motivated and fascinated me. The concepts organically grew as we started shooting, as if we were runners passing a baton to one another.  I watched and helped crochet - Mandy’s fingers crocheted at the speed of a slurping noodle, all the while attending her 4 year old son Hazel with such presence and focus.
 
All of these pieces were also hugely impacted by the dedication and creative insight of musician / composer Jeffrey Huston who dedicated months to making these live performances what they are.
 
Leo Mayberry’s video work was also a huge part of this show as well.  What started out as a simple idea to enhance a scene, ended up a huge project of its own (turning my house into a film studio for a week!).
 
Along with the countless hours of work by the artists involved in this production, there were many many other volunteer workers who attended the crochet parties, and building parties and other work sessions – such generous people who believe in this work.
 
I would like to deeply thank my other co-conspiritors including Anna Lange, Chris  Lefebvre, Robb Kunz, Tina Bunck, Joshua Kohl, and DK Pan and NKO of FreeSheep Foundation as this show would not be possible without them. 
 
Please keep your eyes out for my next projects that I am doing with Degenerate Art Ensemble; SONIC TALES, not to be missed, March 7th2009 at the Moore Theater, presented by STG/Paramount and a work in progress presentation at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York in February 2009.
 
-Haruko Nishimura October 9th, 2008

INTRODUCTION by Haruko Nishimura

I was given an opportunity to commission three artists to work with me for this project.  I wanted to work with Colin, Mandy and Ian, all three are visionaries with unique and distinct languages - so different from each other and from mine -I approached them because I knew that they would give me a challenge that would be out of my comfort zone.  It was my hope that we could freely express our ideas and visions together,  developing the “whole” together in a thoroughly collaborative process seeing how far it would take us…  Not only did they fulfill their part of challenge, but we were able to create a space in which we could try things we’d been dying to try, finding a process with which we were able to weave each others ideas into a single vision. We spent long hours together,  traveled to film locations and got know each other better and to really work in-depth and  learning each other’s ways of working.

The first  video- interactive dance piece featuring Colin Ernst’s sculpture sound dress was inspired by 70’s American weeeble waaable toy “it weebles and it waables but it wont fall down..” (which I was not familiar at all coming from Japan).  After Jenny, his wife showed me her childhood toy, I understood how Colin’s playful ideas were set into motion (literally).   Colin, a full time father, strapped his baby daughter on his back and came to rehearsals, coaching me how to ride the sculpture.

The film, by Ian Lucero, was a collaboration between Mandy, Ian and I. Mandy initially had a vision of a Banana slug and an obsession with the beautiful forests of the Smoke Farm (smokefarm.org) .  She already had a strong sense of where the characters would dwell and exist.  Ian, with his unique perspective - appreciation of hyper-microscopic detail and incredible kinesthetic sense of sound was already at work, sending  E- mails from Portland, incredible images he shot and found for the inspirations for the film.  Ian and Mandy’s visual sensibility - sculptural, spatial, angles and light - motivated and fascinated me. The concepts organically grew as we started shooting, as if we were runners passing a baton to one another.  I watched and helped crochet - Mandy’s fingers crocheted at the speed of a slurping noodle, all the while attending her 4 year old son Hazel with such presence and focus.

All of these pieces were also hugely impacted by the dedication and creative insight of musician / composer Jeffrey Huston who dedicated months to making these live performances what they are.

Leo Mayberry’s video work was also a huge part of this show as well.  What started out as a simple idea to enhance a scene, ended up a huge project of its own (turning my house into a film studio for a week!).

Along with the countless hours of work by the artists involved in this production, there were many many other volunteer workers who attended the crochet parties, and building parties and other work sessions – such generous people who believe in this work.

I would like to deeply thank my other co-conspiritors including Anna Lange, Chris  Lefebvre, Robb Kunz, Tina Bunck, Joshua Kohl, and DK Pan and NKO of FreeSheep Foundation as this show would not be possible without them.

Please keep your eyes out for my next projects that I am doing with Degenerate Art Ensemble; SONIC TALES, not to be missed, March 7th2009 at the Moore Theater, presented by STG/Paramount and a work in progress presentation at the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York in February 2009.

-Haruko Nishimura October 9th, 2008

So the premier of “The Silvering Path” is over!  But it will evolve and grow and live on in other forms and places.  I’ve had such a rush of people after each show wanting to talk with me about the piece, and emails, I thought I would paste my thoughts about the process of making this work here (which was in the dark in the theatre).And Haruko wrote some really incisive words in the program about what her intention was …I will hunt them down and post as well.  This has been such an expanding and thrilling project and I am personally so grateful for all the hard work and talent and positive vibe of all the people Haruko brought together to create this experience!  I know there are many many people who are quite invigorated  about what they saw and felt at the Free Sheep."My approachto this collaboration adventure was to just stay what I am – a sculptor and installation artist. I usually make large installations that transform spaces into seemingly enchanted environments, creating full body experiences, like trespassing on a theatrical set. This film turns this on its head; the remarkable environment we live in becomes a ready-made installation. I approached the body as an armature that is usually made of steel and paper mache, but now flesh, blood and Huge and Heroic Haruko spirit. Building a flexible but lumbering skin around her body was one approach to tap into the bizarre and almost otherworldly undulations of the Arion Slug. My Slug is a goddess, one of appetite and compassionate desire, moving all dead matter through its liminal state towards creative regeneration. In this cycle, none of us can escape the Silvering Path. In Haruko’s hands and body, the sculpture I started now tells its own story of hunger, indulgence, transformation and Eros. She is both creator and destroyer. The silvery slime continues in the vein of my installations from the past several years; which is to make visceral transitory states of the human emotional experience tangible through the overabundance of crocheted fabric. I’ve used Pheromones to represent love, Blood to show sacrifice and loyalty, and Milk is caretaking and the physicality of empathy. The Silvery mucus of a tiny creature can transform our bodies into infinite possibility, which is both terrifying and liberating. The thin glittering line represents the preciousness of our time here in this body, both valiant and evanescent.Just as in our film, our collaboration is three heads, hands and hearts woven together; So too are woven in a million tiny gestures, crochet stitches made by myself, friends and strangers alike. Like the Three Fates spinning out human destiny, our film keeps time with a woven cloth of soil. At the end, our hero looks back on a patchwork of her life’s work, both comforting and lasting and continuing to grow after she is gone. I can only hope for the same myself, and I believe it is the root of all creative actions.My most Earnest thanks to Haruko and Ian for their generosity and talents, and for lending me a hand in my own growth as an artist and person.”

mandy

So the premier of “The Silvering Path” is over!  But it will evolve and grow and live on in other forms and places.  I’ve had such a rush of people after each show wanting to talk with me about the piece, and emails, I thought I would paste my thoughts about the process of making this work here (which was in the dark in the theatre).
And Haruko wrote some really incisive words in the program about what her intention was …I will hunt them down and post as well.  This has been such an expanding and thrilling project and I am personally so grateful for all the hard work and talent and positive vibe of all the people Haruko brought together to create this experience!  I know there are many many people who are quite invigorated  about what they saw and felt at the Free Sheep.
"My approach
to this collaboration adventure was to just stay what I am – a sculptor and installation artist. I usually make large installations that transform spaces into seemingly enchanted environments, creating full body experiences, like trespassing on a theatrical set. This film turns this on its head; the remarkable environment we live in becomes a ready-made installation. I approached the body as an armature that is usually made of steel and paper mache, but now flesh, blood and Huge and Heroic Haruko spirit. Building a flexible but lumbering skin around her body was one approach to tap into the bizarre and almost otherworldly undulations of the Arion Slug. My Slug is a goddess, one of appetite and compassionate desire, moving all dead matter through its liminal state towards creative regeneration. In this cycle, none of us can escape the Silvering Path. In Haruko’s hands and body, the sculpture I started now tells its own story of hunger, indulgence, transformation and Eros. She is both creator and destroyer. The silvery slime continues in the vein of my installations from the past several years; which is to make visceral transitory states of the human emotional experience tangible through the overabundance of crocheted fabric. I’ve used Pheromones to represent love, Blood to show sacrifice and loyalty, and Milk is caretaking and the physicality of empathy. The Silvery mucus of a tiny creature can transform our bodies into infinite possibility, which is both terrifying and liberating. The thin glittering line represents the preciousness of our time here in this body, both valiant and evanescent.
Just as in our film, our collaboration is three heads, hands and hearts woven together; So too are woven in a million tiny gestures, crochet stitches made by myself, friends and strangers alike. Like the Three Fates spinning out human destiny, our film keeps time with a woven cloth of soil. At the end, our hero looks back on a patchwork of her life’s work, both comforting and lasting and continuing to grow after she is gone. I can only hope for the same myself, and I believe it is the root of all creative actions.
My most Earnest thanks to Haruko and Ian for their generosity and talents, and for lending me a hand in my own growth as an artist and person.”

mandy

A Thousand Thanks To the Ninjas
Every night, I am more and more a fan of the musical stylings of the Ninjas, Joshua Kohl and Jeffrey Huston.  I don’t think I can ever taste nutella again without hearing “click-click, breath, stomp, breath, stomp, click-click”.  It all wouldn’t be half as gorgeous to watch and take in without the amazing sound and music!  thank you.
mandy 

A Thousand Thanks To the Ninjas

Every night, I am more and more a fan of the musical stylings of the Ninjas, Joshua Kohl and Jeffrey Huston.  I don’t think I can ever taste nutella again without hearing “click-click, breath, stomp, breath, stomp, click-click”.  It all wouldn’t be half as gorgeous to watch and take in without the amazing sound and music!  thank you.

mandy 

ww short inspiration

ww short inspiration

ideas for weeble wobble shorts

ideas for weeble wobble shorts

Ideas for weeble wobble shorts

Ideas for weeble wobble shorts

Kindred Media just posted this video clip about Haruko Nishimura (aka. The Slug Princess) on Vimeo. It is really well made.

the reviews for our show are starting to appear…
'Silvering Path' a memorable collision of dance, music, film and art
- by Michael Upchurch The Seattle Times

the reviews for our show are starting to appear…

'Silvering Path' a memorable collision of dance, music, film and art

- by Michael Upchurch The Seattle Times

Behind the Scenes #3: The Silvering Path

Shows Kamala PA’ing and documenting, Otis the war paint dog, and Mandy discussing stump scene while I have gastric issues.


Created with Admarket's flickrSLiDR.

A whole bunch of new photos by Kamala Dolphin-Kingsley from the shoot at Smoke Farm.

Behind the Scenes #2: The Silvering Path

Haruko preps for the mirror and field scene while Paul looks for river caves, drives across a raging river and gets some much needed sleep.

The Silvering Path

Preview 2

About:

Plot Outline:
A Slug Princess and Sower meet in a poetic landscape of giant crocheted cabbages, jeweled slug slime and animated mushrooms that celebrate the regenerative creative power of the life cycle.

Release Date:
2008

Directed By:
Ian Lucero

Written By:
Mandy Greer, Haruko Nishimura and Ian Lucero

Starring:
Haruko Nishimura, Mandy Greer & Ree Anne Halonen

Music by:
Joshua Kohl, Jeffrey Huston, Haruko Nishimura & Ian Lucero

NEXT SCREENING WILL BE AT:
Next Dance Cinema
on December 6, 2010 @7pm
Seattle, WA (MAP)

Official Website silveringpathfilm.blockmyeye.com

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